Quiet Leadership Research: Grace

The final section of Quiet Leadership explores the notion of ‘Grace’, described as a fluidity of leadership, an agility of style and response.

It’s about constant course correction, to find an individual expression of leadership in the smallest of actions: in this, the fourth of a series, i am sharing the initial narrative from the global research project. This is very early stage work, shared as part of #WorkingOutLoud.

  • Nobody thought that Leadership was entirely effortless: most believed that at least some course correction was involved.
  • Almost all respondents believed that Leadership could be described as an evolutionary process: one that never stops.
  • Most people felt unable to evaluate whether they have a natural rhythm in their Leadership: whilst they found it hard to evaluate it in themselves, they wrote a lot of words about it, which may represent a questing for an answer through narrative.
  • Most people believe that their Leadership practice is more reflective than reactive: they did not believe they were buffeted too badly by the storms.
  • In general, people found it quite hard to articulate their own leadership.
  • People expressed that they were unable to act in harmony with their Organisation when they lacked the knowledge of intent, or when there was a misalignment of core values. This is unsurprising.
  • There was a strong agreement that feedback is necessary to ascertain our impact as a Leader.
  • People strongly agreed that reflection is important for course correction.
  • Trust was identified as a disrupter: the lack of it prevents us from acting in harmony with the Organisation. It was described as the ‘oil’.

About julianstodd

Author and Founder of Sea Salt Learning. My work explores the Social Age. I’ve written ten books, and over 2,000 articles, and still learning...
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