The Learning Science Journey

I have completed the main illustrations for the Learning Science Guidebook (*i think): there are twenty three of them, and i finished up by redrawing four of the original ones that i had initially shared on the blog. This is not unusual: most of my work iterates fast, and the early sketches really represented me finding the visual style and approach, and helped to give the idea some shape.

I’m trying to walk a fine line in the Learning Science work: in line with all of these books, it is not a set of answers, so much as a space to explore, with the right guidance and support. The Guidebook represents my current understanding, and efforts to sketch out a useful journey, but i am aware that it will not be right for everyone.

This is one of the central challenges of #WorkingOutLoud: your work rarely represents perfection (if such a thing exists) but is rather an evolving story which one tries to improve over time. I am comfortable with imperfection, as long as the story is as strong as i can make it with my current understanding. The only time i get frustrated is when people point out faults with glee: i share it to be wrong, not to convince anyone that it is right. Within a community, when we help it other to do better, it should be with generosity and pride.

The illustration here maps out the journey that the Guidebook takes: to construct your personal discipline. I think that this is right: we can be given formal job descriptions and take formal courses, but the art of learning is to create your own style. Evidence based, fluid and adaptive over time, unafraid to be wrong, but working towards being better.

About julianstodd

Author and Founder of Sea Salt Learning. My work explores the Social Age. I’ve written ten books, and over 2,000 articles, and still learning...
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1 Response to The Learning Science Journey

  1. Pingback: ‘Meta-Cognition’ and ‘Sense Making’: Virtual Learning Design [Pt 5] | Julian Stodd's Learning Blog

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