The Social Consequence of Exclusion #2

Excuse first: some days it’s hard to write, it’s just too busy. I’ve delivered a full day workshop, then travelled into the evening to prepare for another full day tomorrow. But #WorkingOutLoud is not about sharing excuses, it’s about sharing fragments of thought. And being unafraid to share imperfect or incomplete work. Today, i’m sharing the evolution of one of the illustrations i used today.

The Projection and Failure of Trust

This is the original, it is used to talk about exclusion from a group: once we have ‘conformed’, to gain membership, we run the risk of ‘exclusion’, if we subsequently dissent. But i included ‘frames of trust’ within the illustration, and it’s cluttered. This evening, between two trains, i redrew it.

The Projection and Flow of Trust

This new one is not perfect, but it’s the best i could do at speed, and it removes some clutter. The main idea i wanted to convey was how ‘members’ were different, so i switched to squares. The new member ‘conforms’ on the surface, but may have to ‘shield’ aspects of self to do so. This ties into another notion, that we may bear a cost of membership, in service of some future goal.

Really i need to redraw the whole slide, but i will prototype this new version in tomorrows session.

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About julianstodd

A learning and development professional specialising in e-learning and learning technology.
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4 Responses to The Social Consequence of Exclusion #2

  1. tutormentor1 says:

    I suggest you create a SNA map of a chat on Twitter and look at how there are some large influencers who are hubs and smaller contributors who have less connections. Then there are many outliers with no connections. If this represents a group, or a group in formation, how might the rules of engagement be similar or different from the graphic you’re working on?

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