Social Leaders Do What’s Right, Not Just Easy

It’s a fine line: working within an organisation we have to fit within certain systems, take certain actions that are governed by the rules and social pressures of the organisation, but ultimately there’s a point where we have to take a stance. Will we do what’s right, or just what’s easy. This is not a conversation about people doing bad things, but rather a conversation about doing the right thing. Within our formal power, in a formal role, we do what needs to be done, but as a Social Leader, if we wish to be worthy of the title that we must earn, then we need to do what’s right.

Social Leadership 100 - Do What's Right

What does this look like? It means actively fighting for equality, striving for fairness in everything we do, and calling it out when we see failures. It means not waiting for requests for help, but anticipating it. It means acting with great authenticity, even when that authenticity takes us into conflict with the organisation itself. Doing what’s right is not always easy, but it is always right.

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About julianstodd

A learning and development professional specialising in e-learning and learning technology.
This entry was posted in Social Leadership and tagged , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

4 Responses to Social Leaders Do What’s Right, Not Just Easy

  1. Shaun James says:

    But isn’t being ‘right’ and doing the ‘right’ thing a matter of perspective and opinion?

    • julianstodd says:

      I guess that’s why it’s sometimes hard to know what ‘right’ is: it’s not always an obvious or easy choice. In my own view, it would be about fairness, but even that is contextual. Sometimes there are no ‘right’ choices. Thanks for visiting and sharing that thought, best wishes, Julian

      • Shaun James says:

        Very true. If we could be certain that every decision was the right one, life would be so much simpler! Referendums would never be needed! Thank you for the posts, I enjoy reading them.

  2. Pingback: Stories of Difference | Julian Stodd's Learning Blog

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