Change Curve: Generating or Losing Momentum in Change

I’m expanding on the Change Curve framework at the moment. So far i’ve introduced the framework, explored 16 Resisters of Change and 16 Amplifiers, as well as looking at the Antibody Effect in Detail. Today, i’m pausing to look at a high level at change, in particular, how we generate momentum or lose it. The primary message of the Change Curve framework is the move from being Resistant to change, through to Constrained, then finally to Dynamic. The Resistant organisation loses momentum whilst the Dynamic one builds it.

The Change Curve: Generating Momentum in Change

Today, i’m not writing a full article, but rather developing some imagery for the full model, and sharing a few thoughts around it (one challenge is with #WorkingOutLoud is giving yourself permission not to feel the need to only release complete work. This is work in progress, fragments of a full story that is being written over weeks).

The Dynamic organisation understands and uses mechanisms of amplification and co-creation to take embryonic ideas, the initial intent, and to gather momentum. If we get it right, the change story evolves and takes on a momentum of it’s own.

The Change Curve: Losing Momentum in Change

The Resistant organisation kills the energy, it muddles along and becomes increasingly lethargic. It is infra-structurally unable to change. The sixteen Resisters contribute to this lethargy. The 16 Amplifiers can add to the energy.

The 16 Resisters of change

Everything we are looking at within the Change Curve framework is intended to assist us in mastering these amplifying mechanisms and spreading them within the organisation, immunising it to lethargy.

Amplifiers of Change

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About julianstodd

A learning and development professional specialising in e-learning and learning technology.
This entry was posted in Change, Change Management and tagged , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

13 Responses to Change Curve: Generating or Losing Momentum in Change

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