A six stage methodology for learning. Part 1 – overview

When i’m designing a learning solution, i use a methodology that i’ve refined over time. This is about the underlying structure of the learning, so it applies to any format, be that mobile learning, e-learning, classroom training or social learning. Different learning formats suit different parts of the methodology, and part of it’s use it to determine what best to do where, to greatest effect. It’s my blueprint for instructional design and i thought this would be a good time to explore it in some detail over a number of days.

Methodology

Julian Stodd’s 6 stage methodology for learning design

A methodology is a checklist, in this case, across six steps: Context, Demonstration, Exploration, Reflection, Assessment and Footsteps. In each area, i think about different things that need to be done and certain things that i want to avoid. I use it as the conductor uses a baton: to give the learning pace and tempo. It’s not a recipe for success, but it does let me ensure that any learning solution, be it mobile, social or face to face, has integrity and coherence.

This methodology works for me: i share it in the hope that you will use the bits that work for you, discard those parts that don’t and share your own ideas and thoughts. My idea isn’t right, it’s just right for me.

In each of the subsequent posts, i’m going to focus on one element of the learning methodology, provide an OVERVIEW of what should be done, as well as some key QUESTIONS to ask. Finally, i’m going to try to summarise each one with a REMEMBER statement: ‘yes’, this is what it’s all about and ‘no’, this is not the point. If nothing else, it will help to clarify my thinking further.

Learning is not necessarily a science, but neither is it entirely an art. You need structure, you just don’t need too much of it, and structure itself will not guarantee learning (although good storytelling may).

Understanding how people learn and which methods to use at which stage is a foundation for the design of engaging learning solutions. It sits at the heart of everything.

About these ads

About julianstodd

A learning and development professional specialising in e-learning and learning technology.
This entry was posted in Design, Education, Effectiveness, Engagement, Instructional Design, Learning, Learning Methodology and tagged , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

22 Responses to A six stage methodology for learning. Part 1 – overview

  1. Pingback: A six stage methodology for learning. Part 1 - ...

  2. Pingback: A six stage methodology for learning | Curiosit...

  3. Pingback: A six stage methodology for learning. Part 2 – Context | Julian Stodd's Learning Blog

  4. benoitdavid says:

    Sounds quite interesting… Like your orchestra “pace and tempo” analogy: highlights the engagement in the (learning) experience…

  5. Pingback: A six stage methodology for learning. Part 3 – Demonstration | Julian Stodd's Learning Blog

  6. Pingback: A six stage methodology for learning. Part 4 – Exploration | Julian Stodd's Learning Blog

  7. Pingback: A six stage methodology for learning. Part 1 &n...

  8. Pingback: A six stage methodology for learning | Edumorfo...

  9. Pingback: A methodology for learning. Part 5 – Reflection | Julian Stodd's Learning Blog

  10. Pingback: A methodology for learning. Part 6 – Assessment | Julian Stodd's Learning Blog

  11. Pingback: A methodology for learning. Part 7 – Footsteps | Julian Stodd's Learning Blog

  12. Pingback: A methodology for learning. Part 8 – Case Study | Julian Stodd's Learning Blog

  13. Pingback: Running in the rain: risk and reward in learning | Julian Stodd's Learning Blog

  14. Pingback: Mobile Learning: the state of play | Julian Stodd's Learning Blog

  15. Pingback: Pathways | Julian Stodd's Learning Blog

  16. Pingback: Experiential Learning | Julian Stodd's Learning Blog

  17. Pingback: On the second day of Christmas Learning: speed | Julian Stodd's Learning Blog

  18. Pingback: Reflections on the Social Age | Julian Stodd's Learning Blog

  19. Pingback: Extract from Handbook for Social Leadership: Co-Creation | Julian Stodd's Learning Blog

  20. Pingback: Extract from Handbook for Social Leadership: Co-Creation | Julian Stodd's Learning Blog

  21. Pingback: The New Work | Julian Stodd's Learning Blog

  22. Pingback: Reflections on #mLearnCon: learning from our social lives | Julian Stodd's Learning Blog

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s