Curating yourself in social learning spaces: adding value

I was having a long conversation yesterday afternoon with someone who is just returning to work after five years away, raising children. She was pondering on how to ‘get‘ Twitter, how to do something meaningful with social media and how to help curate and create a social learning community. Mainly she was worried about being out of touch, which was, of course, a red herring.

It’s easy to get out of touch with technology, but we rarely get out of touch with storytelling: it’s at the heart of how we communicate, how we build relationships, how we share and how we learn. And i’d imagine that children help you to keep your storytelling skills very much up to date. The technology? Well, it’s important, but it’s transient. I couldn’t even start to list all the apps, social bookmarking, social media management and mobile devices that i can’t use. It’s a long list! But it’s not the be all and end all of things: good storytelling is your trump card.

Facts, experience and knowledge are all very well, but how do you reflect and add value?

Facts, experience and knowledge are all very well, but how do you reflect and add value?

It’s a question of how we add value within the community: what facts are you taking, what knowledge do you have, what are your experiences and how are you reflecting upon all of that? How are you adding value.

That’s the real question, not the question of whether you can learn to use the technology. It’s easy to learn that bit.

Our reputation, our value within social learning spaces, is based upon our ability to do more than just churn information. We need to be able to find things out, but we need to be able to do things with that information, and we need to be able to change our stance and style according to the situation. One size no longer fits all: we are in a constant state of flux and only the agile will thrive.

I particularly like Harold Jarche’s thinking in this space: too many good thoughts to list, but do connect with his blog if you can. He constantly explores dimensions of this changing environment and is bringing some strong models to the question of how we add value in this area (with his Seek/Sense/Share model).

The question of value is an important one: it’s easy to be prolific, but being prolific in itself add nothing, indeed, it may actively detract from one’s reputation. Saying something of value is better than trying to say everything.

I use the word ‘curation‘ deliberately, although i guess the role of an editor would be just as valid: newspapers don’t print everything that they find out. They go through a process of validation and cross checking. They select an appropriate journalist to investigate and they try to find an angle on the story. It’s about the storytelling, not just the facts. I can find the facts out from a range of sources, it’s the interpretation that gives the facts colour and, possibly, relevance.

We can easily end up focusing on fact, on experience, on knowledge, but the real value comes through reflection and the ways that we add value.

About these ads

About Julian Stodd

A learning and development professional specialising in e-learning and learning technology.
This entry was posted in Agile, Apps, Authority, Brand, Curation, Experience, Fact, Ideas, Information, Journalism, Knowledge, Learning, Learning Technology, Meaning, Mobile Learning, Narrative, Personal Brand, Reflection, Social Media, Stories, Storytelling and tagged , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

40 Responses to Curating yourself in social learning spaces: adding value

  1. julianstodd says:

    Reblogged this on "Exploring the world of social learning" and commented:

    Exploring how we curate ourselves in social learning spaces: taking knowledge, facts and experience and reflecting on that to consciously decide how we add value. All part of building our reputation.

  2. Pingback: Curating yourself in social learning spaces: adding value | Digital Storytelling 2.0 | Scoop.it

  3. Pingback: Curating yourself in social learning spaces: adding value « Amazing WWWorld

  4. Pingback: Curating yourself in social learning spaces: adding value | Story and Narrative | Scoop.it

  5. Pingback: Curating yourself in social learning spaces: adding value | Julian ... | SteveB's Social Learning Scoop | Scoop.it

  6. Pingback: Curating yourself in social learning spaces: adding value | elearning&knowledge_management | Scoop.it

  7. Pingback: Curating yourself in social learning spaces: adding value | Digital Delights - Digital Tribes | Scoop.it

  8. Pingback: Curating yourself in social learning spaces: adding value | immersive media | Scoop.it

  9. Pingback: Curating yourself in social learning spaces: adding value | Social Media for Learning & Education | Scoop.it

  10. Pingback: Curating yourself in social learning spaces: adding value | Books and Kids in the Digital World | Scoop.it

  11. Pingback: Curating yourself in social learning spaces: adding value | Gestión de conocimiento | Scoop.it

  12. Pingback: Curating yourself in social learning spaces: adding value | Laboratorio de Herramientas | Scoop.it

  13. Pingback: Curating yourself in social learning spaces: adding value | libreacademia | Scoop.it

  14. Pingback: Curating yourself in social learning spaces: adding value | PLN on Veterinary Education | Scoop.it

  15. Pingback: Curating yourself in social learning spaces: adding value | 21st Century Learning and Teaching | Scoop.it

  16. Pingback: Curating yourself in social learning spaces: adding value | information analyst | Scoop.it

  17. Pingback: Curating yourself in social learning spaces: adding value | Educación y Tecnologías de la Información y Comunicación | Scoop.it

  18. Pingback: Curating yourself in social learning spaces: adding value « ABC de mi PC

  19. Pingback: Curating yourself in social learning spaces: adding value | Collaborative online tools | Scoop.it

  20. Pingback: Curating yourself in social learning spaces: adding value | Value Based Leadership | Scoop.it

  21. Pingback: Curating yourself in social learning spaces: adding value | E-learning, tools and methodologies | Scoop.it

  22. Pingback: Curating yourself in social learning spaces: adding value | Learning Solutions for Tomorrow | Scoop.it

  23. Pingback: Curating yourself in social learning spaces: adding value | EEB426 Becoming a Professional teacher | Scoop.it

  24. Pingback: Curating yourself in social learning spaces: adding value | Teachning, Learning and Develpoing with Technology | Scoop.it

  25. Pingback: Curating yourself in social learning spaces: adding value | Leadership in education | Scoop.it

  26. Pingback: Curating yourself in social learning spaces: adding value | Better teaching, more learning | Scoop.it

  27. Pingback: Curating yourself in social learning spaces: ad...

  28. Pingback: Social learning for complex tasks: performance support is simple | Julian Stodd's Learning Blog

  29. Pingback: The future of books: the evolution of publishing | Julian Stodd's Learning Blog

  30. Pingback: The Social Contract | Julian Stodd's Learning Blog

  31. Pingback: Learning what to leave behind: agile learning in the Social Age | Julian Stodd's Learning Blog

  32. Pingback: Authority: the changing nature of authority in social learning | Julian Stodd's Learning Blog

  33. Pingback: Curating yourself in social learning spaces: ad...

  34. Pingback: Curating yourself in social learning spaces: adding value | Aleshia Clarke

  35. Pingback: Manifesto for the Social Age: A first draft of the narrative | Julian Stodd's Learning Blog

  36. Pingback: Nine skills in a Curriculum for Social #Leadership | Julian Stodd's Learning Blog

  37. Pingback: Legacy, lethargy, and the need to be #agile | Julian Stodd's Learning Blog

  38. Pingback: Denied: outdated models of authority and control in the Social Age | Julian Stodd's Learning Blog

  39. Pingback: Can we keep social spaces social in a networked world? | Julian Stodd's Learning Blog

  40. Pingback: Creative Space | Julian Stodd's Learning Blog

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s